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LABOR LAW

Submitted during Internship under Legal Specs by Vedant Singh Pal

Labour law, also known as employment law, is the body of laws, administrative decisions, and precepts that address legal rights, and limitations, for employees and their organizations. Therefore, it mediates many aspects of the relationship between unions, employers and workers. In other words, labour law defines the rights and responsibilities of workers, union members and employers in the workplace. Generally, labour law includes Industrial relations, Occupational health and safety and Employment rates, including holidays, annual leave, working hours, unfair dismissal, minimum wage, retrenchment procedures and termination pay. There are two broad categories of labour law. First, collective labour law relates to the three relationships between an employee, an employer and a union. Second, each labour law affects workers' rights at work and in the contract of employment. The labour movement played a key role in enacting legislation that protected workers' rights during the 19th and 20th centuries. Workers' rights have been part of social and economic development since the industrial revolution. The word ‘work’ means productive work, especially work done physically to earn wages. Labour law, also known as employment law, is the body of laws, administrative decisions, and precepts that address legal rights, and limitations, for employees and their organizations. The law relating to labour and employment in India is best known under the broad section "Industrial Law". Existing social and economic conditions have played a major role in shaping India's labour law, which regulates various aspects of work such as the number of working hours, wages, social security and the services provided. Unify the four laws, and to provide uniformity in labour laws is a positive step taken by the government. This action will only be able to achieve its goal if those employees are aware of their rights. It is clear that labour laws themselves do not solve workers' problems because workers are poor, educated, ignorant, and weak in negotiating with employers. A large part of the Indian Population mobilizes workers to earn a living guided by the policies and conditions of employers. Therefore, it is the government's responsibility to protect them by recognizing their rights and responsibilities.


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